Wednesday, September 17, 2008

Bisaya Rap, Obscenity, etc.


From youtube, I came across this post of kids rapping by Jon Joaquin. If I am not mistaken, the poster is the same guy who regularly writes a column in one of the local papers in Davao City. The kids come from Times Beach, one of the poorest coastal areas in Davao City.

Times Beach hogged the local headlines because of the controversial reclamation area operation by a motel here. The controversy stemmed from the failure of the management of a motel here to get necessary papers from the city government for their operation. And despite warnings from the local chief executive, the management remained, it would, unperturbed. I joined the "fray" through my editorial cartoons. My latest drawing had criticized the suggestion of some local councilors for the motel management to pay for the rent instead. Other legislators disagreed with the proposal. In my drawing (which will be posted later) depicted some local legislators saying this line: "Wow, cute, magrent ka nalang kaya? (why not pay a rent instead?)."

This is the same motel that constructed a statue of David (Florence, Italy). When it was constructed, many quarters reacted to it saying that it was a display of obsecinity. For me, it is obscene only for one thing that it is a mockery to the art of Michelangelo as a poor copy of his statue. The park became well-known to promenaders as "Otinpark" (the prefix is vernacular's male genetalia).

Anyway, rap is a hit in the local music scene today. Obviously, many kids love it as part of the favorite expressions as shown in the video I imported from Mr. Joaquin's channel. Perhaps, the influence of rap on the children was due to the mushrooming home-grown rap artists with their brands of Bisaya rap music more often packed with funny stories. Some of their works are slowly gaining commercial success or popularity with local radios playing them very often as a show of full support to the local music scene.

During my elementary days (forget when it was), rap was not popular yet among us kids. What we had was this manner of speaking or talking that could be likened
rapping because of its rhyme. The mechanic was to insert additional expressions to all words in the sentence or phrase. Let me see if I still remember it. So instead of the regular sentence: "Nag-unsa ka dinha? (What are you doing there?)" becomes "Nag-unga-dinsa i-nga-di-ka dinangadinha?" Hmmm. something like that. And perhaps the answer would be: "Wangaladila!" (from "wala - which means "nothing"). It sounded nice to our ears then because of the "music" it created.

Anyways, enjoy the Bisaya rap of the kids.

(Florence statue is left, right is the poor copy)

4 comments:

badz said...

i have heard those kids rapping.. i was fascinated how their mind runs and put words into sentence & tune that make sense about love & betrayal..

hihii..kids do it everyday & beg for money in return.Parents ignore for their means of living instead of sending the kids to skul.

sachin said...

very nice blog...

http://shayrionline.blogspot.com/

Herson Juego said...

Rhythmic Accentuated Poetry (RAP) as one of my friend puts it. While I'm not very much into rap, I have a feeling that these kids can hit it bigtime someday.

Vk-mahalkaayo said...

agud....grabe ka nindot uy...

tinood ni ha, moota gani ako anak kim, hinumdom siya sa amoa barrio, daghan man mga bata ingon ani, pero wla cya kadungog ingon ani kanta....karaoki...

pero kini, prima.....nindot kaayo.

orig gyd ni or duna background.....

bitaw, Prima, Bravo.........

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